Blind Spots

josh-calabrese-527813The Chicago Tribune has featured recent articles on cultural blind spots. “That is, everyone is missing a cultural puzzle piece – a movie, a TV show, a museum, a play, a record, etc..”

I’m not too worried about missing a few cultural puzzle pieces, but I’ll confess to some of them. I’ve never read The Iliad, The Odyssey, or Moby Dick, have not watched one episode of The Sopranos and only one or two of The X-Files, and I’ve never seen Pulp Fiction or The Rocky Horror Picture Show. The appeal of The Bachelor, and all reality TV for that matter, remains a mystery to me.

I know I have blind spots. Some of them are simply things that I haven’t been exposed to, but others are willful blind spots. There is so much information and entertainment available that choices must be made.

However, here are some blind spots, willful or not, that are hazardous to a correct view of God, the world, and ourselves.

Some people view the God of the Old Testament, angry and vengeful, as different from the God of the New Testament, loving and gracious, and therefore they don’t bother with the Old Testament. A quick reading, or a few verses here and there, may indeed lead you to that opinion, but it is a blind spot.

After studying the Bible for years, my eyes are wide open to the truth about the character and wisdom of God. God is one, and God doesn’t change. He did not evolve or adjust his temper for the New Testament. Yes, the Old Testament is more violent and there are some difficult scenes, but the love and grace of God are still on full display. If you have eyes to see.

I the Lord do not change. Malachi 3:6

We don’t hear too much about sin these days, but it is a reality for every one of us. Have you heard this sentiment? People are basically good. It’s society’s faulty systems or unhealthy family dynamics or negative experiences that make some people bad. Those things do have an effect, but the underlying logic, that we’re all fundamentally good people, is evidence of a blind spot.

We are all sinners in need of a Savior. Anyone who has raised children knows that a child requires no instruction to be selfish. It comes very naturally. Children must be taught to be kind, to share, to think of others, and even children who learn to show those qualities will find different ways to sin. It’s a fact, and to disregard it is a blind spot.

…for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus. Romans 3:23-24

There are those who feel that God behaves like an angry judge, inflicting punishment for every sinful act, or conversely, that God is only loving and isn’t at all bothered by sin. Neither is true. God is both perfectly loving and flawlessly just, and to ignore one attribute or another is evidence of a blind spot.

Righteousness and justice are the foundation of your throne; love and faithfulness go before you. Psalm 89:14

God’s great love was shown at the cross, where he sent his Son, Jesus, to die an undeserved death for us. It was also evidence of his perfect justice, for the wrath of God was not overlooked or forgotten, but it was poured out on Jesus. When we accept the truth of the love of God and the sacrifice that Jesus made for us, then the Holy Spirit begins to open our eyes.

“Lord,” they answered, “we want our sight.” Jesus had compassion on them and touched their eyes. Immediately they received their sight and followed him. Matthew 20:33-34

God is our loving, gracious, and just Father. We are hopeless sinners without Jesus Christ. The more I’ve learned about who God is, his character, his ways, the more my eyes have been opened to his love.

What are your blind spots, cultural or spiritual?

Photo by Josh Calabrese on Unsplash

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 Responses to Blind Spots

  1. Beth says:

    I had to think about this one. I haven’t read the Tribune article, but I wonder who gets to pick what is in the big picture, the big puzzle? I am missing a lot of cultural pieces, but as you’ve so clearly written, when we are in God’s Word, our eyes are open to His grace and mercy. I still have a ton of blind spots. Not sure I can open my eyes to everything out there, but I love how books and reading can open me up to worlds, history, people, cultures, and more that I might have never known or seen.

    • Judy says:

      Your comment got me thinking…maybe we are all blind to things that matter until God opens our eyes. Maybe we come into this world as one big blind spot! In fact, maybe the term “blind spot” is misleading, for it presumes that we can see everything else. I’m rambling here, Beth! I share your love of books, many of which have opened my eyes to things I had never thought about or had any experience with, and it’s always a pleasure. Thanks for your comment!

  2. Larry Who says:

    One of my greatest blind spots is that I assume everyone has a sense of humor like I do. This causes a few problems here and there, especially with my wife who sees more drama in life than I do. Oh well! Maybe we’re a perfect match, balancing each others’ personalities.

    • Judy says:

      A sense of humor is a tremendous gift, and so is a sense of drama. As long as you’re not blind to the other, you should balance yourselves out nicely! Thanks Larry!

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